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Category: Features

Film Releases: Weekly Round Up

A round up of this week’s new releases by our Editor Linda Marric

The Maze Runner: The Death Cure

The third and final instalment of this very popular dystopian trilogy sees it opening with a bang. An impressive action set piece which could rival any thriller worth its salt. The film is however sadly let down by a meandering screenplay which doesn’t seem to have got the memo that less is always more.

Dylan O’Brien et al are back for one last spin of the wheel and we are prepared to follow them up to a point. The narrative sadly fizzles out towards the end when the makers can’t quite decide which ending to go for so decide to use all five. Watchable nonsense, just don’t expect much more from it.

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Most Anticipated Movies of 2018

By Freda Cooper

So that was 2017, the year when horror became the genre of choice and broke a few boundaries into the bargain. When every month had at least one blockbuster, or a superhero movie – or both. When some superheroes weren’t exactly super. And when fan backlashes became the norm, from La La Land to The Last Jedi.

But, most importantly of all, people still kept going to the movies. Because, despite the inevitable flops and disappointments, as well as the more serious, longer term issues, it was a pretty good year as far as the films themselves were concerned. Those of us that write about cinema have had one hell of a job compiling our top tens – even top twenties – this year, because there were so many contenders.

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The 10 Best TV Shows of 2017

Rachael Kaines picks her favourite TV shows of 2017. Do you agree?

We have been blessed by yet another great year for television, with the golden age showing no signs of ending or even slowing down. Deciding a top ten is very difficult this year, it could have easily included things like Catastrophe, Big Little Lies, Game of Thrones, Easy (why is no one talking about this show?), and, of course, Twin Peaks (not allowed on this list, everyone decided it was a movie).

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The Best Christmas Films You Will Re-Watch Yet Again This Christmas

Complied by Rachael Kaines

Christmas is a time of joy, and in honour of that so is this list. Filled with the films that you will quite happily watch for the ninth time (even though you insist it’s crap) after a cheese course large enough to down an elephant, whilst sipping slow gin and fluctuating between contentedness and intense nausea. These movies as much a part of Christmas as turkey and fights with the in-laws.

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Best Films Of 2017 By Sigridur Petursdottir

Icelandic film journalist and screenwriter Sigridur Petursdottir picks her favourite films of 2017. 

Three​ ​Billboards​ ​Outside​ ​Ebbing,​ ​Missouri​ – Martin McDonagh

Frances McDormand has been one of my favourite actresses for a long time. In this movie, she gives it her all. Mildred is funny, tragic, dangerous, sensitive, clever, hurt, but also crazy. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is a brilliant film. It’s well written, it makes you laugh, and it makes you cry and everything else in between. 

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Interview: Screenwords meets Daniel Rezende

Interview by Rachael Kaines

You may not have heard of Daniel Rezende, but there’s a good chance that you’ve seen his work. He was nominated for an Oscar, and won a BAFTA for editing 2002’s City of God, he edited other Brazilian gems such as The Motorcycle Diaries, Elite Squad and it’s sequel, City of Men (City of God’s sequel), and Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life.

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Best Films of 2017 by Rachael Kaines

Screenword’s own Rachael Kaines selects her favourite films of 2017.

1 – Call Me By Your Name (Luca Guadagnino)

Could you imagine anything better than spending a summer somewhere in Northern Italy, reading, swimming, and falling in love? Me either.

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Best Films Of 2017 By Robert Chandler

Continuing our end of the year series, writer and producer Robert Chandler picks his favourite films of 2017 for Screenwords.

1-LAST FLAG FLYING

It won me over. I was cautious. A somewhat sequel to The Last Detail, one of the great American films of the early 1970s, a film that dealt with life and the inevitability of death, through the journey of three young soldiers: two of them, Jack Nicholson and Otis Young, escorting the third, Randy Quaid, across country to a military prison. Last Flag Flying is a “somewhat” sequel because it features the same three men in essence, thirty-five years later (they have the same character traits, but their names are slightly different). Both films are based on novels by Darryl Ponicsan.

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